Some fantastic albums get brushed to the side, lost in the hustle and bustle of the music world, but still get recognised as underrated albums. Then some albums don’t even get the recognition deserved, they don’t even get noticed. One of these albums is Sub Luna City’s City Rivims MK 1. The group is made up of Jadasea and Rago Foot on the mic, alongside Black Mack and Archy Marshall a.k.a Edgar The Beatmaker a.k.a King Krule producing.

The 11-track album takes you on a journey through the inner city lifestyle of a big city and is chill throughout. The beats are on point and the lyrics and flow just compliment each other in the best way. Songs flow seamlessly with one another and it isn’t more of an album with eleven songs but more of a half hour track that introduces you to a sound exclusive of the English underground scene.

It’s not a surprise if you haven’t heard it, it didn’t get much publicity and they don’t seem to care and haven’t released much since it’s publication on 10th January 2014. One of those rare drops came in July of 2015 when they released a song called Sharknado with a £1000 price tag on it, and if you can afford it I urge you to buy it. But anyway, back to the album.

Straight from the get go you’re encapsulated within the album, you feel wrapped into a city when listening on your headphones. The melodramatic, eerie, minimalistic beats are like no other, and don’t seem to fit into a real genre. This isn’t grime, isn’t hip-hop, but instead a sound so perfectly crafted by these guys, it isn’t just them on this wave though as Jesse James, Rejjie Snow, MC Pinty and Jamie Isaac are all in on it. It’s a sound not heard before and one that is sure to grow in the coming years, as more people are to be entranced by something so simple yet so new.

There isn’t really a right or wrong place to listen to this album, I’ve found myself listening to it on journeys into and out of Leeds City Centre as well as shopping there. It also fits on those nights when you’re just relaxing playing FIFA or even if you’re at a party that’s winding down and you’re there with your mates, this album fits any situation. There’s the perfect balance of instrumental and lyricism, once they’ve done rapping for a good 4/5 minutes, you’ll be put into a brilliant instrumental interlude.

Sub Luna seem like the guys you wanna be without realising so, the rapping seems so effortless and you can relate to their lyrics, being trapped in a city and not knowing where to go. They speak the mind of tens of thousands of youths up and down the country and it’s a shame not much at all has been put out since.

There’s not one bad song on the project, Weed and Warfare stands out as a masterpiece from both rappers as well as the sample on the beat. But the  highlight of the album has to be the final track, Salmander’s Passage. The six minute piece is the most minimalistic part of the album, it seems like a freestyle and the beat is so so so simple. It’s the perfect end to an album and you’ll realise how good the album actually is upon listening to it and realising it’s over without you knowing it and you just wish there was more.

Sub Luna City put out a classic, no disputing this for me. It’s personally my favourite album and I’m still dumbfounded how it hasn’t got more support, be sure to check it out and pick it up for only £3. The link will be below and be sure to let us know of any albums you think are good but aren’t known.

https://sublunacity.bandcamp.com/album/city-rivims-mk-1

words by Rohan Parmar.